Awards

The H. George Frederickson Award

The H. George Frederickson Award honors a senior scholar for career contributions to the field of public management.  Exemplary contributions include, but are not limited to, adding to the intellectual development of the field and building professional capital (e.g., journal development and other means of sharing PM scholarship and information) related to public management research. The Frederickson Award is presented annually at the Public Management Research Association conference.

Current Recipient: H. Brinton Milward

The Public Management Research Association is pleased to announce that the winner of the 2019 H. George Frederickson Award is Brint Milward, Director of the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona. The Frederickson Award honors a senior scholar for career contributions to the field of public management. The committee used two sets of criteria for decision making, including the degree to which the nominee has made: (1) scholarly contributions to the intellectual development of public management, and (2) professional capital contributions to the development of the field (e.g., journal development, contributions to PMRA and other organizations, coordination of conferences, mentoring, and other means of sharing scholarship and information).

Brint’s nomination stood out to the committee for several reasons. First, Brint has undoubtedly made scholarly contributions to the field. As one of the most cited scholars in public administration, Brint’s orbit is large. However, Brint is not just known in public management, but also has gravitas and standing in other disciplines. His interdisciplinary efforts – which bridge and merge ideas from political science, sociology, organizations and management, and history among others – has pushed the boundaries of public management research and encouraged us to think in new ways about old problems.

Second, Brint has made outstanding professional capital contributions to the development of the field. His is a past President of PMRA and NASPAA, and has served (or serves) on the editorial boards for a wide range of public administration journals. He has been an exceptional mentor to a wide range of students as well as junior scholars, many of whom are now leading the field and making both intellectual and practical contributions in their own right. Brint also is a successful academic entrepreneur and has provided leadership instrumental to the success of the University of Arizona and its programs.

Committee members: Tina Nabatchi (Syracuse University), Jae Moon (Yonsei University), Stephanie Moulton (Ohio State University), and Bill Resh (USC)

Past Recipients:

2018 – John Bryson

2017 – Rosemary O’Leary

2016 – Hal Rainey

2015 – James L. Perry

2013 – Barry Bozeman

2011 – Kenneth J. Meier

2009 – Beryl Radin

2007 – Christopher Hood

2005 – Laurence Lynn, Jr.


The Beryl Radin Award

The Beryl Radin Award is for the best article published in JPART. It is awarded annually and presented at the Public Management Research Association conference.

Current Recipient: John B Holbein & Hans J G Hassell: When Your Group Fails: The Effect of Race-Based Performance Signals on Citizen Voice and Exit, 29(2), 268–286, https://doi.org/10.1093/jopart/muy075

Abstract

In recent years, performance-based accountability reforms have become widespread—particularly in the public education system—as a means of enhancing service delivery and citizens’ knowledge of and engagement with government. While an ever-growing literature has considered the overall effects of these administrative systems, few have fully considered the effect these have on underlying subgroups of relevance and inequalities in responses across these groups. In this article, we examine how citizens of various racial subgroups respond when governments send negative race-based signals about the performance of in- and out-racial groups. Specifically, we explore whether No Child Left Behind’s (NCLB) race-based failure signals affect racial groups’ use of voice in school board elections and their use of exit from local public schools. To do so, we combine school and voter administrative records in North Carolina with a regression discontinuity design that leverages exogenous variation around NCLB’s race-based school failure cutoffs. Consistent with our theoretical framework, we find that white and black citizens respond differently to race-based failure signals. We find the whites are more responsive overall: responding to failure signals of various types both by voting in local school board elections and exiting local failing schools. African Americans, however, seem much more sensitive to racialized cues—responding at the ballot box but not by exiting when their group fails. These results show that while performance accountability systems have broader effects than previously realized: shifting the composition of local elections and distorting the racial makeup of schools.

Past Recipients:

2018 – Sebastian Jilke & Lars Tummers, Which Clients are Deserving of Help? A Theoretical Model and Experimental Test?, 28(2), 226-238.

2017 – Sounman Hong, Black in Blue: Racial Profiling and Representative Bureaucracy in Policing Revisited. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 27 (4), pp. 547-561.

2016 – Christine Kelleher Palus & Susan Webb Yackee, Clerks or Kings? Partisan Alignment and Delegation to the US Bureaucracy. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 26(4), 693-708.

2015 – Richard M. Walker & Rhys Andrews, Local Government Management and Performance: A Review of the Evidence. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 25(1), 101-133.

2014 – Jason Grissom, Is Discord Detrimental? Using Institutional Variation to Identify the Impact of Public Governing Board Conflict on Outcomes. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 24 (2), 289-315.

2013 – Kenneth J. Meier & Laurence J. O’Toole, Jr. Subjective Organizational Performance and Measurement Error: Common Source Bias and Spurious Relationships. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 23 (2), 429-456.

2012 – Stéphane Lavertu, Daniel E. Walters, & David L. Weimer. Scientific Expertise and the Balance of Political Interests: MEDCAC and Medicare Coverage Decisions. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 22 (1), 55-81.

2011 – Joe Soss, Richard Fording, & Sanford F. Schram. The Organization of Discipline: From Performance Management to Perversity and Punishment. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 21 (supplement 2), i203-i232.

2010 – Carolyn J. Heinrich. Third-Party Governance Under No Child Left Behind Accountability and Performance Management Challenges. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 20 (supplement 1), i59-i80.

2009 – Keith G. Provan, Kung Huang, & H. Brinton Milward. The Evolution of Structural Embeddedness and Organization Social Outcomes in a Centrally Governed Health and Human Services Network. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 19 (4), 873-893.

2008 – Christopher M. Reenock & Brian J. Gerber. Political Insulation Information Exchange, and Interest Group Access to the Bureaucracy. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 18 (3), 415-440.

2007 – David M. Van Slyke. Agents or Stewards: Using Theory to Understand the Government-Nonprofit Social Service Contracting Relationship. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 17 (2), 157-187.

2006 – Carolyn Hill. Casework Job Design and Client Outcomes in Welfare-to-Work Offices. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 16 (2), 263-288.

2005 – Young Han Chun & Hal G. Rainey. Goal Ambiguity in U.S. Federal Agencies. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 15 (1), 1-30.


The Camilla Stivers Award

The Camilla Stivers Award is for the best article published in PPMG. It is awarded annually and presented at the Public Management Research Association conference.

Current Recipient: Joris van der Voet, Organizational Decline and Innovation in Public Organizations: A Contextual Framework of Cutback Managament, 2(2), 139- 154.

A committee chaired by Professor Gene A. Brewer with Professors Rachel Ashworth and Sharon Gilad as members reviewed all articles from 2019 and unanimously selected the article for this award. The committee believes this paper stands out for its timely and important contribution to public management theory and research. As stated in the abstract, the cutback management literature currently lacks a theoretical framework that accounts for the relationship between cutback management strategies and innovation in the face of decline. This paper fills that need by articulating a theoretically grounded framework consisting of propositions that clarify the anticipated relationships between cutback management strategies , organizational innovation, and organizational context. As such, we believe the paper will likely stimulate future research on cutback management and ultimately improve public management practice.


Best Dissertation Award

Current Recipient: Miyeon Song

Professor Miyeon Song is the recipient of the 2020 PMRA Best Dissertation Award. Professor Song’s dissertation, Managing Public Services: The Role of Nonprofit, For-Profit, and Governmental Organizations, addresses how organizations from the three sectors contribute to and are credited with successful public service provision and delivery.

Drawing on the context of the U.S. healthcare system, Professor Song provides compelling theoretical and empirical insights into the environmental, managerial, and individual-perceptual dynamics that shape service quality. Song’s findings extend and underscore the pivotal role of publicness. Public and nonprofit organizations face unique challenges–at the environmental and individual level–but organizations in these sectors also draw on unique managerial strategies and environmental advantages. For example, Dr. Song’s findings underscore that market competition can be negative for for-profit service deliverers, but beneficial for government and nonprofit service organizations.

The committee was particularly impressed with Dr. Song’s use of archival and original data to bring together multiple, pressing lines of PA inquiry: organizational performance, citizen perceptions, publicness, environmental contingencies and networking.

Professor Song’s dissertation has practical relevance in terms of health care delivery but also in approaching service-delivery across the wide variety of policy areas where public, nonprofit, and for-profit organizations operate.

Song is a graduate of Texas A&M University. Her dissertation committee was comprised of Professors Kenneth J. Meier, Ian R. Turner, Maria C. Escobar-Lemmon, and Justin B. Bullock.

Past Recipients:

2019 – Andrea Headley

2018 – Huafang Li